Don’t Go to a Belly Dance Festival or Workshop Without These Essentials

I write a lot about essential knowledge for belly dancers, but what about the practical items? All the book smarts about belly dance history aren’t going to save you from injuring yourself during a long weekend or week of dancing.

After attending many festivals and intense workshops for over 17 years, here are the essential items I think every dancer shouldn’t be without.

Belly Dance Festival Essentials

(This post contains affiliate links.)

1. A versatile water bottle.

If you’re not hydrating enough, you’ll make yourself more prone to injury, illness, and burn-out. Always have your own water bottle with you, and keep it full. It’s better to drink more water before you realize you’re thirsty. If you’re thirsty, it’s too late!

Personally, I really love insulated, stainless steel bottles. They’re durable, won’t break, and suitable for drinks of all temperatures. Klean Kanteen’s 16-ounce insulated bottle holds just enough coffee for starting off the morning right. And Hydro Flask’s 18-ounce wide-mouth cap is easy to carry or strap to your dance bag. And while we’re talking about hydration, don’t forget that you’re going to get hungry, too. Bring your favorite snacks to keep your brain and body going during those full days.

2. High fidelity earplugs.

A lot of us still kicking around the belly dance scene are getting older, and that means protecting our hearing. Even Dance Magazine recently published an article about how dancers often neglect their hearing, and yet find themselves in pretty loud situations.

Essential for dancers: ear plugs

Protect your ears before it’s too late.

Any earplug made for musicians or concerts will help protect your ears without sacrificing being able to hear the music or the instructor. I suggest that you get a pair that has a cord, so that you can keep them around your neck and so they’re easier to find in your dance bag, purse, or finger cymbal pouch. I’ve lost so many earplugs, but my corded ones are still hanging around (pun alert!).

These earplugs by Reverbs have two different filters depending on your ear sensitivity. LiveMusic sells these in large and regular (regular is fine for my small ears) as well as two different filters.

3. Proper dance shoes.

I’ve attended and taught at festivals that have had less-than-ideal surfaces for hours and hours of dancing. Many festivals are still held in hotel ballrooms, which have the worst possible combination for dancing joints: industrial carpet over concrete.

Investing in a pair of shoes will save you from questionable dance surfaces. Some people love jazz sneakers, while I prefer jazz shoes with plastic on the ball of the foot. This will help protect your knees from turns, still allow you to feel the floor, and the plastic is far more sturdy than suede-soled ballet shoes on those rough carpets. I love the Bloch Flow slip-on jazz shoe, and they really do stand the test of time. I also add in a foam insole for extra cushion.

Come prepared with a variety of shoes, from ball-of-foot covers to jazz sneakers, just in case!

4. A great notebook.

I’m not a huge fan of taking notes during workshops (it feels like different headspace for me), but I always have a notebook. Even if it’s a tiny, purse-sized one, like these softcover Moleskine notebooks. Not only will a notebook come in handy to jot down new tips and tricks you’ve learned throughout the event, but it’s also fantastic for collecting names of new contacts… the old-fashioned way. And don’t forget a pen!

And, as an instructor, I would like to ask that you not take notes on your phone. First of all, handwriting will commit the information to memory better, but it also looks like you’re not paying attention if you’re on your phone.

5. Foam roller.

Essential: Foam Roller

Vibrating. Foam. Roller.

Using a foam roller essential for any dancer who’s working intensely at a festival or workshop. I love the TP Therapy roller: it’s durable, textured, and hollow, which means that it’s great for travel. I can stuff it full of clothes, and it doesn’t take up a lot of room in my luggage.

If you really want to treat yourself (and you’re driving to a workshop instead of flying), check out this bad boy: The Hyperice Vyper. It vibrates. With three settings and a rechargeable battery, your muscles will have no choice but to be relaxed. TP Therapy has a more reasonably-priced vibrating roller, and it weighs just a little over 2 pounds.

6. Kinesiology tape.

The scientific verdict is still out on whether the stretchy therapeutic tape actually helps, but I’m a big believer. And a recent study suggested that application of the stretchy adhesive tape increased reaction time in non-dominant hands.

There are many brands of tape, but I’ve found KT Tape—available at most drug stores—to work just fine. KT Tape makes two kinds: cotton and nylon. The nylon tends to stay on longer, and yes, you can wear either one in the shower. Other dancers and athletes like Rock Tape or Kinesiotex. If you have sensitive skin, you might need to try to a few different brands to see what works for you.

Learn how to use and apply the tape before trying to stick it to yourself. KT Tape has lots of very helpful videos online, but consult with a physical therapist if you have a specific injury you’re trying to protect.

7. A small first aid kit.

You can make your own, but having a small supply of adhesive bandages, alcohol wipes, tweezers, pain killers, and other items can make or break your festival or workshop experience.

This little first aid kit has every thing you need for minor injuries. As a former (and current) Girl Scout, I always make sure to have these items on hand, because you never know when you’re going to need them or help out a fellow dancer.

8. Baby wipes.

So, maybe the dance floor wasn’t so terrible, and you danced barefoot… but now your feet are filthy! Be prepared with a pack of baby wipes, so you don’t put your dirty feet into your clean socks or shoes.

Plus, if you get sweaty, baby wipes are a great way to refresh if you don’t have time for a shower. These travel-size packs by Babyganics will fit right into your dance bag.

What essentials do you bring to every festival or workshop? Share in the comments!


13 Dance Class Etiquette Tips You Should Know

Today’s post is brought to you by Angelique Hanesworth, dance instructor and photographer based in New York State. Originally posted to her Facebook page, I thought it could use a little extra visibility and love. 


Following proper dance class etiquette is essential for dance students at all levels. Some of you might know these tips, but we can always use a little reminder.

General rule of thumb: Be aware, be respectful, be kind (to others as well as yourself) and have fun!

13 Dance Class Etiquette Tips guest post by Angelique Hanesworth

Essential Dance Class Etiquette

1. Arrive on time. Arriving late to class is disruptive to the other students, the teacher, and can set up the potential for injury if you do not have enough time to properly warm up. If for some reason you must be late, contact the instructor beforehand to get approval.

Most dance classes, regardless of where they are or what style of dance they teach won’t allow you into class if you’re more than 10 minutes late.

2. Have a good attitude. Energy begets energy, and for a lot of students, this is their one hour a week that they get to leave the house and do something fun for themselves. It can be frustrating when we don’t get something on which we’ve been working, but remember, if it were easy, everyone would do it.
We all have our own challenges—every last one of us—and learning how to manage them properly will help you on the dance floor, as well as in life.

3. Turn off your cell phones. ‘Nuff said.

4. Try not to leave the dance floor for the duration of class. If an emergency arises, leave discretely.

5. Do not talk when the teacher is speaking. You might think you are being quiet, but if you’re talking, you’re likely not as quiet as you think you are. If you have a question for the teacher, wait for the right moment, and raise your hand. Make sure it is a question that you cannot figure out on your own.

6. Do not correct other students. That is the teacher’s responsibility.

7. Do not correct the teacher. If the teacher has made a mistake (which is bound to happen) and it is causing confusion in the class, it is fine to politely ask for clarification. If you have a difference of opinion or philosophical perspective, it is best to save it for after class. Give the teacher the courtesy of judging for themselves whether it is something that should be shared with everyone else.

8. Take correction well. If a teacher corrects you, congratulations! That means they are invested in your development. Perfection is a myth, so don’t let your ego get in the way of your progress. If you hear a correction being given to another student, pay attention! There is a good chance it applies to you as well!

9. Practice. You go to dance class to learn, but you’ll make your progress when you practice outside of class. Make sure to do all homework, and work on any combinations/choreography, so that upon returning to class, you can spend the majority of your time learning new material instead of spending that time on review.

10. Wear appropriate attire and mind your hygiene. Proper attire will vary from class to class, but as a general rule, you are training, not performing. Wear something you can get sweaty in and move comfortably in. Keep your jewelry to a minimum; it can be noisy and catch on clothing. Please wear deodorant to class. And many people are sensitive to scents, so please avoid perfume.

11. Keep it clean! No food or gum on the dance floor. A water bottle is fine. As a general rule, if you brought it in, take it out.

12. Use common sense. There is no way I can list every etiquette rule for every situation. Being respectful of the other students, the teacher, and being a hard worker will cover many of the bases.

13. Have FUN! Ultimately, this is YOUR class too, and you should be having a good time. Every teacher feels good when their students leave the room happy, so enjoy the process. Dance is an enriching experience, so be proud of your hard work, celebrate your accomplishments, and keep your eye on the continuing journey ahead.

Dance teachers: What etiquette tips would you like new students to know? What would you like to remind your current students? Share yours in the comments!


Angelique HanesworthAbout the Author

Angelique Hanesworth began belly dancing in 1997, training with top talent from all over the world. Specializing in a Salimpour interpretation of Modern Oriental dance, she holds her Level 5 certification in the Suhaila Salimpour Format and Level 4 in the Jamila Salimpour Format. She is a highly sought after performer, with experience in theater productions, festivals, weddings, restaurants, and more. Between regular classes and workshops, she has taught hundreds of students and is known for her clear direction and creative insight. Angelique can also be seen on her acclaimed instructional DVD, Advanced Layering Drills. Angelique holds a degree in Computer Science, and black belts in Wing-Chun Kung Fu and Ishin-Ryu Karate. She is an accomplished portrait photographer, as well as Mom to two feisty and wonderful girls. Visit her website at angeliquebellydance.com





Why You Should Foster a Mindful Dance Practice

What does it mean to foster a mindful dance practice?

Fostering a mindful dance practice blog post by Abigail Keyes

Mindfulness Is Good For You

Being mindful, according to experts in the field, is the act of noticing your feelings, environment, and physical sensations without judgement. It is the opposite of what we might call “checking out” or being on “auto-pilot.” Being mindful means ignoring our Ego and our “Monkey Mind.” And even though it has roots in Buddhist meditation and philosophy, it can be quite secular.

Some of the most powerful business leaders are investing millions of dollars on mindfulness workshops and retreats for their employees. Marc Benioff of the San Francisco-based company Salesforce famously consulted with Vietnamese Zen monks to improve employee well-being, and Google’s “Search Inside Yourself” program has a 6-month long wait list.

A number of scientific studies have shown that people who practice mindfulness meditation are less likely to have a wide range of illnesses, from heart disease to depression. Those who exhibit trait mindfulness—that is, those who make mindfulness an inherent habit rather than just a deliberate practice—are even healthier.

Mindfulness also has a profound positive impact on our interpersonal relations, allowing us to observe our emotions and the emotions of others before reacting. It can even reduce implicit age and race bias. Whoa.

Dancers Are Already Mindful…

Dancers by nature practice a kind of mindfulness when we go to class. When we integrate new movements into our bodies, we must be aware of the present, listening to our bodies, observing our instructor… hopefully without judgement.

When a class is just challenging enough, we are forced to be present if we want to physicalize what is expected of us. Maybe it means remembering a full combination or doing a difficult technical element. We can’t mentally check-out if we are to integrate these movements into our bodies.

When it comes to mindfulness, dancers have a leg up. (Pun alert.) Afterall, dance technique is really just fancy habits, and habits are what we do without thinking.

…But Sometimes Not Enough

But what about those movements that we know? What about that repetitive drill that we’ve done a bazillion times or that choreography we’ve been running for five years? You know… those exercises that when your teacher asks you to do them, you might go, “But I know this already!”

It’s super easy to go through the motions and take a mindless approach to these elements of our dance practice, letting our bodies take the lead.

We dancers often rely heavily on “muscle memory” to get us through a rehearsal or performance. It can be easy to let our body do the work, and it should. There is a certain amount of automaticity that must happen in our bodies for us to do our job. But sometimes that doesn’t always mean transcendent mind-body connection. A recent study compared practitioners of Vipassana meditation with a sample of dancers, and found the meditators had a greater integration of mind and body.

I’m sure you’ve noticed when a dancer is not being mindful in class or rehearsal. Maybe there’s that one who doesn’t know how long their arms are and keeps running into you. Or maybe there’s a fellow company member who keeps making the same mistake over and over again. Or that one who just doesn’t integrate a doable correction, no matter how many times the instructor or director reminds them.

These dancers could benefit from taking a moment to reflect and observe their bodies.

Chances are that if you noticed these mistakes, you made a judgement call on them. Maybe a little mindfulness could help you, too!

Dance is Always New, Even When It Feels Old

Every day we step into the studio or on the stage, we must take a moment to take account of our bodies. Every day is different. Weather, hormones, a bad day at work, a fight with our significant other can all affect our movements.

When we give ourselves a moment to acknowledge those changes, and, most importantly, accept them, our time in class and rehearsal can be more productive and more positive.

A mindful dance practice also allows us to find the newness in material that might no longer interest us or challenge us. Every dance form has those movements and techniques that we must do over and over again, whether it be a part of our warm-ups or performance. But as performers, we cannot afford to get bored, because our audiences will feel that lack of engagement. They’ll know that we’ve checked out and let rote muscle memory do the heavy lifting.

And as a dance teacher, I can tell when my students are checking out. And I can tell you that it sometimes gives the impression that they don’t care about the work. Ouch.

Small Ways to Be More Mindful While Dancing

Many dance classes have repetitive warm ups, or at least movements that repeat every time. Instead of just going through the motions, observe yourself as you do these exercises. Are you putting your full attention into them, or is your mind wandering? If it wanders, breathe, and focus on the intent of the exercise.

Personally, I like to focus on different body connections as I dance. What is the relationship between my fingers and my toes? The crown of my head and my sacrum? My right and left halves? What about your facing in the room? Taking account of how these shift as I move gives my Monkey Mind more than enough to chew on, allowing my more active thinking to focus on the task at hand.

The next time you learn a combination or new dance, how can you best be mindful not only of your own body but the space around you? Maybe you are that dancer with the long arms who runs into fellow students. Notice when this happens, and observe how much space you need without popping someone else’s space bubble.

At the end of class or rehearsal, take note of how you feel. Were you happy with yourself or frustrated? Did the teacher give you feedback? Did a fellow student’s behavior affect you? How did it make you feel? Do you think you did well? Reflect, but don’t judge.

I feel that I’m just beginning to integrate mindfulness into my dance and teaching practice. Is this something you do, either as a teacher or student? Tell us in the comments!





Adult Dancers: You Are Making Progress

getting-betterAdult dance students are often quite hard on themselves. We take all of our adult baggage into the studio classroom with us (and I use “we” because I do it too!), and expect to be able to do anything the teacher asks of us perfectly the first time.

Well, when put that way, it sounds a bit ridiculous. No one can do anything perfectly the first time. So why do we pressure ourselves like this when learning a new skill, particularly one as challenging as dance?

Adults need more time to learn

We adults should be kinder to our beginner selves. Being a beginner is an exhilarating and inspiring experience if we allow it to be. Not only does allowing ourselves to learn and make mistakes make the whole “learning new things” thing easier and less stressful, but our adult brains just don’t take in information as quickly and in as large amounts as they did when we were younger.

In his book Guitar Zero, Gary Marcus notes that adults, with their limited time to practice and diminished brain plasticity, have to learn new information in smaller chunks than children. He also says that kids learn new things so quickly because their brains are growing and developing so quickly, they often have more time to devote to learning a new thing—unfettered by jobs, raising kids, household chores, and other “adult” responsibilities—and they are, of course, often way less self-conscious than adults are when learning something new. Being a child means learning new things every day.

Adults, however… we think people are judging us, and we have egos to feed, and we want to feel accomplished because we’re all grown up and that’s what grown up people do: they accomplish things and do them well, and we can’t possibly take up something new and look like a beginner again. That would be… embarrassing.

Dance isn’t easy. We do things in the studio that we often don’t do in daily life. That’s the appeal, isn’t it? We don’t do plies, 6-steps, or upper back curves while walking down the grocery aisle (well, I know some of you do, and keep on with your bad selves). So why do we expect to be able to do a new move or technique in the studio classroom the first time the teacher asks it of us?

Stick with it

Then if you do stick with dancing, you might not think that you’re getting better at all. There’s that phenomenon that happens that when you are involved in something regularly, it’s so difficult to see your progress in that activity. Or when you have children, you might not see on a daily basis how quickly they’re growing, but a relative who hasn’t seen them in a year will blurt out the inevitable, “Wow! They’ve gotten so BIG!” You look down at your kids and think, “Well, yes, but I see them everyday…”

That’s my job as an instructor, though: To see my students every week (or more), and also recognize the overall, long-term progress that they are making. I’ve had students for over a few years now who might not think that they have improved at all, but I can see how their technique is stronger, their timing more accurate, and their posture lengthened. And part of my job is to tell them that I do see it, even if they don’t see it themselves.

As students of anything, we must find instructors (and I suspect most teachers of anything) who can see the micro-level of the day-to-day—giving subtle technical and timing reminders and, of course, encouragements—as well as the macro, month-to-month, year-to-year progress that each student makes in their own time.

Everyone improves at their own pace

All of us will improve at our own pace. Some of us will progress very quickly, and others will have to take their time in a particular level or class for months, maybe years. It’s so easy for us as adults to compare ourselves to the other students in class, but we have to recognize that each of us is going to learn and progress in different ways. Each of us has our gifts and each of us has our challenges. And if you look back a year, you’ll see how much you’ve gotten better.

I guarantee that if you’re going to class regularly, you are getting better. There’s almost no other option but to improve!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save